PFM Logo Fokker Triplane Model T Curtiss Canuck

Curtiss Canuck

Project History

Awards

Grand Champion Antique - Southwest Regional Fly-in, 2004

Canuck flying

The Curtiss Canuck was a variant of the Curtiss Jenny that was built in Canada. The Canadian JN-4 evolved from the JN-3, but did so independently of the Curtiss-built JN-4. The two versions are still quite similar. The major visible differences are the shape of the rudder, which is more rounded on the Canuck, and the installation of ailerons on both the top and bottom wings. The PFM Canuck is a model JN-4(Can), number C.308.

Mr. F. G. Ericson, Chief Engineer of Canadian Aeroplanes, Ltd., designed the changes for the Canuck, and it first flew in January of 1917. The actual number built is not known, but about 1260 were delivered as Canadian JN-4 aeroplanes. A further 87 JN-4A models were also built, so total production was about 1347. The U.S. Army purchased about 680 from this production run, designating them JN-4(Can) to distinguish them from Curtiss-built JN-4s. Our Canuck, C.308, was one of these machines.

The U.S. Army flew the Canuck extensively in Texas, training pilots for both the American and Canadian armies. By mid-1918, the Canucks were being phased out, and in early 1919 a large number were sold to the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Corporation for resale. Many of these Canucks ended up as barnstormers in the early 1920s. The Museum has painted our Canuck to represent a typical barnstorming aircraft of this period.

Canuck Specifications

    Wingspan:  43 ft. 7-3/8 inches (upper)
               34 ft. 8-5/16 inches (lower)
    Length:    27 ft. 2-1/2 inches
    Height:    9 ft. 11 inches
    
    Crew: 2 people, tandem seating
    
    Empty weight:  1352 lbs.
    Gross weight:  1876 lbs.
    
    Engine:  Curtiss OX-5, 90 h.p. at 1400 RPM
    
    Performance:
        Landing speed:  45 mph
        Maximum speed:  75 mph
        Cruise speed:   60 mph